Ople on the Spanish language

Having been founded in 1922, the Premio Zóbel is considered as the country’s oldest literary award open to all Filipino writers in the Spanish language. Among those who had won the prestigious prize were poet Manuel Bernabé (1924), diplomat León Mª Guerrero III (1963), and renaissance man Guillermo Gómez Rivera (1975). But in the late 1960s to the early 1970s, it was put to a halt because the number of participants dwindled. In 1974, the Zóbel de Ayala clan changed the rules of the contest so that anyone in Filipinas who promoted the preservation of the Spanish language could become an awardee. Nineteen years later, in 1993, Senator Blas Ople, a non-Spanish speaker, became a consequence of that 1974 decision.

Image result for premio zobel ople

“80 Años del Premio Zóbel”, a compendium of Premio Zóbel’s history, was published in 2000. The book’s author, Lourdes Castrillo Brillantes, was herself an awardee in 1998.

This is not to say that the choosing of the then neophyte senator was nothing short of a scandalous matter among Filipino writers in the Spanish language. He received the award “por sus relevantes méritos en pro de la cultura hispano-filipina” (for his relevant merits in favor of the Spanish language). One such merit was the following essay that he wrote in his column “Windows” which used to appear in Panorama magazine (a supplement of Manila Bulletin’s Sunday issue). The essay was published on 30 August 1992, a year before he was awarded a Premio Zóbel medal.

Image result for blas ople windows panorama

Blas Ople (1927–2003).

Our Spanish past lingers in Iloílo with subtle charm
Blas Ople

Having sat down from the rigors of an obligatory speech on current issues, I thought I would sip my coffee in peace, mentally braced for an evening of pleasant boredom.

This was Iloílo City, and the Lions clubs from all over Panay and some from Negros Occidental had filled the vast hall of the Hotel del Río by the river, for the 42nd anniversary of the Iloílo City Host Lions Club. Then magically, the grace and charm of our Spanish past rose before our eyes.

Dancers in full Spanish costumes, platoon-size formations, materialized on the floor. They called on a vast repertory, not just one, two, or three, but many numbers, turning an otherwise banal dinner into a bewitching hour redolent of history. It was only in Iloílo, I thought, that simple housewives, many of them now grandmothers, could be formed into flamenco dancers of such charm, on demand (I was told later they rehearsed for a month for this show).

I gathered that Iloílo and nearby Bacólod are just about the last places where sizable remnants of an elderly Spanish-speaking generation may be found, though this, too, is slowly fading away. But the rhythms of Spain will probably long outlive the Castilian speech in these parts, judging from the authentic passion of those movements we watched that night.

Compared with these, the rigodón de honor danced by the elite in Tagálog cities and towns has to be judged a pale initiation.

Few Filipinos are of course shedding a tear on the waning of our Spanish past, except as this has been subsumed in native speech and customs. The memories of those early centuries still rankle.

This is the revenge of Rizal and del Pilar, whose works have molded, through generations, our impressions of the era of Spain in the Philippines. But when recently, all the countries of the Iberian world met in México, as though eager to repossess their common heritage from their Spanish past, I felt a certain pain to realize that the Philippines alone was not present, for the reason that we have disinvited ourselves.

I should reveal this now. In the Constitutional Commission of 1986, I fought until the end to have Spanish retained in the new Constitution as an official language, together with Filipino and English. I wanted at least an explicit recognition of Spanish as such a language until the wealth of historical material in our archives, most of this in Spanish, can be fully translated into English or Filipino.

But the real reason was that I wanted to preserve our last formal links with the Iberian world, which includes most of the countries in Latin Américas with a population of about 400 million. I remember Claro M. Recto’s sentimental journey to Spain, which was aborted by a heart attack in Rome. If we lost that final strand of solidarity with the Spanish-speaking world, we, too, would never get to Spain.

It was as though both sides had agreed on a policy of mutual forgetfulness.

The “radicals” in the Con-Com strongly advised me not to press the provision on Spanish, because this would have the effect of reopening other controversial issues in the draft charter. It could delay the framing of the Constitution beyond an acceptable deadline.

My worst fears have been realized. We have expelled ourselves from the Iberian community of nations. The rift is final, and will never be healed.

But I felt the charms of our Spanish past will linger longest in places like Iloílo, and during that enchanted evening, I was glad for the opportunity to savor them. We may have left the Iberian world of our free choice, but the hold of Spain will never really cease in the Filipino heart.

To those who are unfamiliar with the issue, it was former President Corazón Aquino’s Constitutional Commission of 1986 (the one mentioned by Senator Ople in his column) that decided the fate of the Spanish language in Filipinas. It should be remembered that Spanish had been our country’s official language beginning 24 June 1571. It may had been unceremoniously booted out from the 1973 Constitution by pro-Tagálog politicians during the 1971 Philippine Constitutional Convention under Ferdinand Marcos’s presidency, but the former strongman, realizing its worth, issued Presidential Decree No. 155 two months after the 1973 Constitution was ratified. Believe it or not, this forgotten Marcos decree recognized Spanish (alongside the English language) as one of Filipinas’s official languages. It thus absolves his 1973 Constitution of any culpability when one wishes to point an accusing finger at the “killer” of the Spanish language in our country.

All index fingers will of course lead to the present constitution, the progenitor of the Constitutional Commission of 1986. No wonder Ople was devastated: he was its member, he fought for the Spanish language’s preservation in the present constitution, yet he was blocked by those radicals from doing so (they were probably those whom Hispanistas and non-Tagálogs today derisively call as “Tagalistas“). That is why, out of disillusionment (or anger?), he wrote that painful statement that we Filipinos have expelled ourselves from the Spanish-speaking community of nations.

But that was 1992. It’s 2018 now, and attitudes toward the Spanish language and our country’s past under Spain for that matter have drastically changed. The enlightened Filipino youth of today will surely disagree with the late Senator’s statement that the rift done by the present constitution’s non-inclusion of Spanish was final, and that it will never be healed. Already, we have several groups in social media, particularly in Facebook, that advocate the return of the Spanish language to Filipino mainstream society such as the SPANISH language should be back in the PHILIPPINES!Oficialización del Español en Filipinas (this one has more than eleven thousand members!), and Defensores de la Lengua Española en Filipinas. Outside of Facebook are blogs that extol the virtues and blessings of our country’s Spanish past: we can cite With One’s PastHecho Ayer, and the Hispanic Indio just to name a few. Then there is Jemuel Aldave Pilapil who organized the Sociedad Hispano-Filipina together with other Hispanists to safeguard and promote the language, thus inspiring me to label him as the new Isagani (watch out for his group’s website to be launched very soon!). The presence of Instituto Cervantes de Manila with its monthly cultural events is a great boost in the efforts to “reintroduce” the Spanish language and culture to our country. Not too long ago, renowned Spanish-speaking Filipinos launched a documentary citing the importance of the Spanish language as part of our national identity and heritage. Even our country’s premiere historian today, Ambeth Ocampo, already revealed himself as far removed from the usual anti-Spain mold of historians by producing very impartial write-ups about our country’s Hispanic past. Says Ocampo in one of his writings:

The concept of Filipino began not with pre-Hispanic indios but with Spain. Individuals known as Filipinos cannot be traced beyond 1521 when Magellan sailed into the Philippine archipelago. Filipino was mainly a geographic term to begin with, and the notion of Filipinas, a place, a nation, cannot be pushed beyond the first Spanish settlement established by Miguel López de Legazpi in 1565.

I could go on and on, but the point is clear: the rift done by Tita Cory’s flawed constitution is not final. Ople’s fight for the Spanish language’s rightful place in the Filipino cosmos didn’t go for naught. We are healing!

Advertisements

Did Fernando Mª Guerrero just talk to me?

I just woke up about an hour ago, past 10 PM. I then went to one of my bookshelves, grabbed a collection of poetry by Fernando Mª Guerrero (1873-1929), opened up the book (titled Aves y Flores)… then lo and behold! Something strange just happened!

Watch my Facebook Live video here to find out why!

Image result for aves y flores fernando maria guerrero

Aves y Flores, a collection of poems by Fernando María Guerrero (Image: Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

And to think that just a few weeks ago, I was wondering if he ever died as a Freemason or not. Incredible. What are the odds?

Uicang Español = Uicang Filipino (Buwan ng Wika)

At dahil “Buwan ng Wika” ñgayón, pahintulutan niyó po munà acóng gamitin ang uica na sariling atin.

Ñgunit…

Ang español ay uicang Filipino. Hindî itó uicang bañagà. Atin itóng pag-aralan, pagyabuñgin, mahalín, at gamitin sa pang-arao-arao na paquíquipagtálastasan sa capua nating Filipino. Sapagcát sa uícang itó nabuô ang ating pambansáng identidad (identidad nacional). Sa uicang itó nahubóg ang ating nacionalismo. Sa uicang itó binigquís ang ating mg̃a isla, at pinagbuclód ang ibá’t-ibáng raza sa ating archipiélago/capuluán. Yumaman ang vocabulario ng ating mg̃a uicang catutubo (tagálog, bisayà, ilocano, etc.) dahil sa uicang español. Itó ang uicang guinamit ng ating mg̃a bayani para macamít ang ináasam-asám na casarinlán… ¿Hindí ñga bat itó ang uica ng ating pambansáng bayani? Sa pamamaguitan ng uicang español, nilabanan ng maguiguiting na Filipino ang mg̃a manlulupig at mananacop. Sa uicang español din cumalat at tumibay ang ating cultura. Ang tunay na casaysayan ng Filipinas ay nacasulat sa uicang español. At higuít sa lahát, ang ating pananámpalataya sa Dios ay umiral at namulaclác sa pamamaguitan ng uicang español.

Image result for "idioma español en filipinas"

Hindí mababauasan ang ating pagca-Filipino capág tayo’y nagsásalita ng español. Bagcús, maguiguing más completo pa ang ating pagca-Filipino sa uicang itó.

Samacatuíd, ang tunay na Uicang Filipino ay español, hindí tagálog.

¡Mag-aral na ng uicang castila sa Instituto Cervantes de Manila!

 

Reunión de los protagonistas del documental “El Idioma Español en Filipinas”

La Asociación Cultural Galeón de Manila (ACGM) es una organización sin fin de lucro dedicada al estudio, divulgación, y promoción de la cultura e historia hispano-filipina, incluida la lengua española en al archipiélago filipino. Ha organizado seminarios y conferencias sobre historia y cultura hispano-filipina así como promovido el conocimiento mutuo de España y Filipinas, entre otros proyectos. Uno de ellos es la producción del documental “El Idioma Español en Filipinas“, escrito y dirigido por Javier Ruescas Baztán, presidente y socio fundador de la ACGM. El documental trata sobre la historia, la importancia, y el estado actual del idioma español en Filipinas.

La preparación y producción del documental empezaron con una serie de entrevistas a los fines de 2011. Renombrados filipinos de habla español como Guillermo Gómez Rivera, Gemma Cruz de Araneta, Manuel “Manoling” Morató, y Maggie de la Riva fueron algunos de los entrevistados. Fui uno de los que tuvieron la suerte de haber sido incluidos. Después de un año, el documental se estrenó por primera vez en el University of Asia and the Pacific (Universidad de Asia y el Pacifíco). Asistieron algunos de los entrevistados que aparecieron en el documental, incluyéndome a mí. Durante los años siguientes, se mostró el documental en varios lugares en Manila y Madrid, incluso la Universidad de Málaga.

El mes pasado (25 de octubre), Javier organizó por primera vez una reunión sencilla para los protagonistas de “El Idioma Español en Filipinas” en Rockwell Club en la Ciudad de Macati. Aparte de mi y del Sr. Gómez (ayudamos a Javier a organizar la reunión), los que asistieron la cena fueron José María Bonifacio Escoda, Alberto GuevaraMª Rosario “Charito” Araneta, Eduardo Ziálcita, Teresita Tambunting de Liboro (acompañado por su marido Andrés), Trinidad U. Quirino, y Maggie.

Mi querida amiga y comadre Gemma no pudo asistir porque tuvo una entrevista esa noche. Tampoco a Manoling (por lo que he escuchado, se suponía que iba a llegar pero estaba atrapado en el tráfico pesado). Los otros que también estuvieron ausentes en la reunión fueron: Isabel (mujer de Alberto); Benito Legarda, Hijo; Macario Ofilada; y; Fernando Ziálcita. María Rocío “Chuchie” de Vega y Georgina Padilla de Mac-Crohon y Zóbel de Ayala están en el extranjero. Mary Anne Almonte y Trinidad Reyes ya han fallecido (qué descansen en paz eterna).

La imagen puede contener: 5 personas, personas sentadas, tabla e interior

Charito Araneta, Albertito Guevara, Señor Gómez, Maggie de la Riva, y un tal Pete Henson; sólo invitado, no es parte del documental (foto: Miguel Rodriguez Artacho).

Yo, Javier Ruescas (presidente de la AGCM), y José María Bonifacio Escoda (cámara del Sr. Escoda).

En pie (izquierda a derecha): José María Bonifacio Escoda, Alberto Guevara, Charito Araneta, Eduardo Ziálcita, Javier Ruescas, Pete Henson, y Miguel Rodríguez (miembro de la AGCM). Sentado (izquierda a derecha): Tereret Liboro y su marido Andy; Teresita Quirino; Sr. Guillermo Gómez, y Maggie de la Riva. Se tomó esta foto cuando ya dejé la cena (foto: Miguel Rodriguez Artacho).

Durante la cena, se nos mostró el trailer del documental. También fuimos presentados uno por uno por el Sr. Gómez (descrito por Javier como “el corazón y el alma” del documental) porque la mayoría de nosotros no nos conocemos. Javier también nos dio a cada uno de nosotros copias del DVD del documental.

Yo estaba sentado junto a la Srª Quirino, la fundadora del Technological Institute of the Philippines. Ella es una dama muy amable y alegre que está llena de vida a pesar de su vejez. Es triste que no pude charlar con todos porque tenía prisa. Tenía trabajo esa noche, es por eso que fui el primero en irme. Sin embargo, antes de irme recordé a todos cuán honrado que estaba de estar en la misma mesa con respetables y verdaderos filipinos, y que nuestra reunión es un testamento de que el español nunca morirá en Filipinas.

 

“Gracias”: una manera fácil de promover el español en Filipinas

La palabra “gracias” es fácilmente una de las palabras castellanas más conocidas por los estudiantes de este idioma. Diciendo gracias se demuestra no sólo gratitud sino también educación (refinamiento). Y puesto que gracias tiene traducciones en casi todos los idiomas del mundo, es una de las primeras palabras que se enseñan a los estudiantes de la lengua española.

Curiosamente, incluso los que no estudian idiomas están familiarizados con esta sencilla palabra poderosa pero amistosa. Aún más en Filipinas que ha venido siendo un bastión del idioma español en Asia por desde hace más de cuatro siglos.

¿Qué estoy tratando de decir? Sí, estoy sugiriendo que nosotros filipinos siempre debemos decir gracias en lugar de “salamat pô” o hasta “thank you“. Esa es una forma de promoción de la lengua española. Lo he estado haciendo durante años. Cada vez que recibo un buen servicio en los restaurantes de comida rápida, tiendas, y varios establecimientos, cada vez que recibo mi cambio de los conductores de autobuses y chóferes de taxis o jeepneys, cada vez que alguien me da una mano amiga, siempre digo gracias a ellos. Ni una sola vez me dan una mirada de perplejidad, ni una sola vez me preguntan qué significa gracias. De algún modo, entendieron la palabra.

Usad gracias todo el tiempo. Usadlo dentro de vuestros hogares, usadlo en las calles, dentro de vuestras escuelas, las oficinas, incluso en las iglesias. Usadlo con frecuencia entre vosotros. Usadlo de Aparrí hasta Joló. Cuando un desconocido/a te ha ayudado con algo, di “gracias” a él/ella. No os avergoncéis ni siquiera os preocupéis de que no se os entiendan. Creedme — ¡os entenderán! Y ésa es la magia de la lengua española en nuestras islas.

Ya que si es español, entonces es verdaderamente filipino.

¡Gracias por leerme!

Originalmente publicado en ALAS FILIPINAS, con ligeras correcciones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vaya con Dios, Cardenal Vidal…

 

Noticias tristes: falleció esta mañana el arzobispo emérito de Cebú, Cardenal Ricardo Vidal Jamín, el cardenal más antiguo de Filipinas.

“Con gran tristeza anuncio la muerte del Cardenal Vidal,” dijo Monseñor Joseph Tan, el portavoz de la Arquidiócesis de Cebú. “Regresó a la casa del Padre a las 07:28 de hoy.” Lo han confinado en el Perpetual Succour Hospital (Hospital de Perpetuo Socorro) desde el 11 de este mes debido a la fiebre y dificultad de respirar. Fue en ese hospital donde respiró su último.

Aunque Monseñor Tan dijo que todavía no tenía detalles completos de la causa de muerte del Cardenal Vidal, sospecha que su corazón puede haber dado el último aliento debido a su vejez. El cardenal tenía 86 años.

El cardenal nació el 6 de febrero de 1931 en Mogpog, Marinduque a Faustino Vidal de Pila, La Laguna y Natividad Jamín de Mogpog. Fue quinto entre seis hermanos. Su primera comunión fue especial porque la recibió durante el Congreso Eucarístico Internacional cuando se celebró en Manila en 1937. Asistió a la Escuela Primaria de Mogpog (Mogpog Elementary School) para su educación primaria y luego estudió en el Minor Seminary of the Most Holy Rosary (Seminario Menor del Santísimo Rosario, ahora conocido como Our Lady of Mount Carmel Seminary o el Seminario de Nuestra Señora del Monte Carmen) en Sariaya, Tayabas. Luego estudió en Saint Francis de Sales Seminary (Seminario de San Francisco de Sales) en Lipa, Batangas donde estudió filosofía. También estudió teología en el San Carlos Seminary (Seminario de San Carlos) en Macati, Metro Manila.

El Cardenal Vidal fue ordenado como diácono el 24 de septiembre de 1955 y como sacerdote el 17 de marzo de 1956 en Lucena, Tayabas (la ciudad tayabeña donde nací hace 38 años) por el Obispo Alfredo Obviar. El difunto Papa Juan Pablo II (se convirtió en un santo hace sólo tres años) nombró al Cardenal Vidal como arzobispo coadjutor de Cebú en 1981. Más tarde se convirtió en arzobispo el 24 de agosto de 1982, sucediendo al cardenal Julio Rosales.

El 25 de mayo de 1985, se convirtió en cardenal-sacerdote de Ss. Pietro e Paolo a Via Ostiense, y fue uno de los electores cardinales que participaron en el cónclave papal de 2005 que eligió al Papa Benedicto XVI. Fue el único cardenal filipino que lo hizo debido a la mala salud del Cardenal Jaime Sin. De 1986 a 1987, Cardenal Vidal fue presidente del Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Filipinas).

No mucha gente sabe que el cardenal Vidal también fue hispanoparlante (al igual que el obispo que lo ordenó como sacerdote) y fue miembro de la Academia Filipina de la Lengua Española (fue colega de los Sres. Guillermo Gómez, Edmundo Farolán, ex-presidenta Gloria Macapagal de Arroyo, y muchos otros). Aparte de sus deberes religiosos, también fue un defensor de la preservación del idioma español en Filipinas. Con su fallecimiento, hemos perdido otro genuino filipino. Oremos por el eterno descanso de su alma.

Un poema dedicatorio escrito por Edmundo Farolán

Tuve la sorpresa de mi vida la mañana después de la Fiesta de la Natividad de la Virgen María. Al iniciar sesión en mi Facebook, vi que el Sr. Guillermo Gómez Rivera publicó un poema en mi muro. No tenía título, ¡pero inmediatamente noté que era un poema dedicatorio para mí! A primera vista, uno pensaría que el Sr. Gómez lo escribió para mí, pero no, porque es diferente el estilo poético — fue en verso libre con rimas adecuadas; el Sr. Gómez casi siempre escribe en endecasílabos. Resulta que este poema fue compuesto por uno de sus amigos más queridos y compañero suyo en la Academia Filipina de la Lengua Española: ¡el Sr. D. Edmundo Farolán Romero!

He conocido al Sr. Farolán desde hace mucho tiempo, cuando yo estaba en mis 20 años, pero sólo a través del Internet. Ambos somos miembros del Círculo Hispano-Filipino, un foro en línea (en Yahoo Groups!) que fue fundado por Andreas Herbig, un ingeniero alemán que, de todas las personas, estaba muy alarmado con la disminución de la lengua española en Filipinas (por un tiempo, yo era el miembro más joven de este grupo).

Pero la primera y única vez que lo conocí al Sr. Farolán de carne y hueso fue durante la presentación de su libro Itinerancias (colección de versos suyos) en el Instituto Cervantes de Manila, y eso fue hace una década.

No automatic alt text available.

Izquierda a derecha: un servidor y los Srs. Edmundo Farolán RomeroFernando Ziálcita Nákpil, y Guillermo Gómez Rivera, 22 de mayo de 2007, en el Instituto Cervantes, Ermita, Manila.

Gracias a Facebook, hemos estado en contacto desde entonces. He aprendido a llamarle cariñosamente como «Papá Ed». Incluso tengo una copia de su última novela, El Diario de Frankie Aguinaldo, un cuento llena de patetismos psicodélicos, divagaciones filosóficas de la mente, y soledad poética. Realmente es algo que no se puede dejar de leer especialmente por los «bohemios». De todos modos, sin más preámbulos, les presento orgullosamente la última obra de Papá Ed…

A ti joven
Esperanza de nuestra patria
Con chivos y sombrero tropical
José nombrado por nuestro héroe nacional
Alas cual alas de los Ángeles buenos de Dios
Esperanza de este siglo de Facebook y Blogs
Vienes joven para instalar la nueva internacionalidad
Conectando a todos nuestra identidad
Nuestra hispanofilipinidad
Sangre y hueso según Recto nuestra hispanidad

Esperanza, joven Pepe, de nuestro futuro
En esta edad de computadoras
¡Vuela con tus alas
Para continuar el legado
De nuestros patriotas!

Derechos de reproducción © 2017
Edmundo Farolán Romero
Vancouver, Canadá
Todos los derechos reservados.

Rara vez recibo algo que esté escrito para mí, mucho más un poema compuesto por un escritor reconocido en el mundo filhispánico, así que imagínense lo emocionado que estaba cuando lo leí por primera vez. Y el único otro poema que se escribió para mí era del Sr. Gómez, titulado «Boda Extraordinaria (A Pepe y Yeyette)» pero ese poema era también para mi mujer con motivo de nuestra histórica boda filipiniana que sucedió hace cuatro años. Sea como fuere, ¡ahora tengo dos poemas dedicados a mí que fueron escritos por dos gigantes de la Literatura Filipina que también son los miembros más antiguos de la Academia Filipina y por no hablar de ganadores del Premio Zóbel!

Estos poemas de los Señores Farolán y Gómez siempre me mueven a las lágrimas. Siempre consagraré estos bonitos versos suyos en mi corazón cervantino por el resto de mi vida quijotesca.